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French police tell parents to stop posting Facebook photos of their kids--What??

Posted: Fri, 03/11/2016 - 09:11


 

 

National gendarmerie says photos could expose kids to sexual predators and violate their privacy


 

France's national police has urged parents to think twice about posting photos of their children on Facebook, saying the images could jeopardize the privacy and security of their kids. Authorities say that if shared widely, the images could attract sexual predators, while others have warned of the social or psychological problems that children could face later in life. One French expert says parents may even face future lawsuits from their children for violating their privacy.

"Protect your children!" France's national gendarmerie wrote in a Facebook post last month, warning of the recent "Motherhood Challenge" viral campaign that encouraged users to post photos of themselves with their kids. "You can all be proud moms and dads to your magnificent children, but be careful," the post continues. "We remind you that posting photos of your kids to Facebook is not without danger!" A regional branch of the gendarmerie went even further, imploring parents in all-caps to "STOP" the practice altogether.

 

"PARENTS ARE CHARGED WITH PROTECTING THE IMAGE OF THEIR CHILDREN."

In an interview with French newspaper Le Figaro, French internet law expert Éric Delcroix said it's likely that baby photos published today could lead to lawsuits years from now. Under French privacy law, anyone convicted of publishing and distributing images of another person without their consent can face up to one year in prison and a fine of €45,000. That would apply to parents publishing images of their kids, as well. Viviane Gelles, an attorney specializing in internet law, tells the newspaper that French law makes clear that "parents are charged with protecting the image of their children."

France's data protection authority has urged parents to implement stronger privacy controls to limit the audience for their photos, and Facebook has worked in recent years to simplify its privacy settings. Jay Parikh, Facebook's vice president of engineering, recently said that the site is considering a new feature that would automatically alert parents before they share photos of their kids with larger audiences.

"If I were to upload a photo of my kids playing at the park and I accidentally had it shared with the public, this system could say: 'Hey wait a minute, this is a photo of your kids,'" Parikh said at a November conference in the UK. "'Normally you post this to just your family members, are you sure you want to do this?'"


 

Parenting Today

Posted: Sun, 03/06/2016 - 17:31

 

State of Parenting
A Snapshot of Today's Families

Introduction

 
The "decline of the American family" is a narrative that has played out in magazines, newspapers and on our television sets for decades.

While it may be true that divorce rates are still high and Americans are delaying marriage, the idea that American families are worse off and continuing to decline is up for debate. The findings of this new NBC News State of Parenting Poll which was sponsored by Pearson, paint a different story. The results are based on telephone interviews in English and Spanish with 803 parents, guardians, or primary caregivers of children ages 3-18 in the continental United States. Interviews were conducted on both landline telephones and cell phones from October 28 to November 16, 2014. This survey shows that parents are generally positive about the future, spending more time with their children than their parents did with them, and having family dinners together regularly.

In fact, nearly four in five parents report having dinner as a family on most days of the week.Today’s parents also want to be more involved in their children’s education and are largely satisfied with the current state of their schools. While they all agree more than a high school diploma is needed to achieve the American Dream, they also say good social and communication skills can be more important than grades when it comes to their child’s success. But there are gaps in just how positive parents are, largely based on their income, race, level of education and marital status. 

Today's Parents

 
Today's parents prioritize family dinners, spend more time with their children than their parents did with them, and want to be more involved in their children's education.
 

 

 

79% of parents have dinner together as a family on most nights



Research has found that teens who have frequent family dinners are more likely to be emotionally content, have high-quality relationships with their parents and be drug-free. Nearly four in five parents (79%) surveyed said their family has dinner at home together most days a week. Millennial parents, the youngest generation, are actually more likely than Baby Boomers to have meals with their families most of the time.

A Rainbow a Day

Why is it important for kids (and parents!) to eat a variety of colors of fruits and vegetables? This video answers that question and offers tips for picky eaters. 

FAMILY DINNERS
BY PARENT AGE
BY RACE
How often does your family eat dinner at home together?


  • 79.0%17.0%4.0%
    Most of the TimeOnly some of the timeHardly Ever

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Parents today need a variety of skills and talents to effectively balance the demands of their own lives with the challenges of raising well-adjusted children. Parents are often the biggest influence in their child’s lives, and today’s parents believe they should be patient and understanding with their children, more so than setting rules and guidelines.

IMPORTANT SKILLS FOR PARENTS
What is most important for parents to have?



  • 46.0%29.0%17.0%8.0%
    Patience and UnderstandingSet Rules and GuidelinesDesire to be Involved in Child's EducationSomething Else
    Set Rules and Guidelines
     Overall: 29

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51% of parents say they spend more time with their children than their parents did with them.



Children with families who spend time together are often more successful in school, less likely to engage in violent behavior, and better able to adapt to life’s changes. Despite the 24/7 digital world today’s parents are raising their children in, 51% of parents say they spend more time with their children than their parents did with them. But for working parents, striking a balance between time at home and time away can be a struggle - only 46% of working parents spend more time with their children than their parents did with them, for non-working parents, that number is 63%. Time can also be an issue for parents who want to be more involved in their child’s education - 43% say they’re too busy.

BY RACE
BY INCOME
BY EDUCATION LEVEL
How parents feel about their involvement in their child's education


  • 594840405260SatisfiedWish Could be Doing MoreWhiteBlackHispanicWhiteBlackHispanic80604020020406080

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87% of parents believe a large part of their child’s academic success is based on their child’s natural abilities despite how much parents try to help. Despite prior research that shows parental involvement in a child’s education supports better outcomes for their child, including better academic performance, fewer behavior problems and higher graduation rates, parents believe that a large part of a child’s academic success is based on their own natural abilities, no matter how much a parent tries to help. Find ways you can help your child here.

 

High Marks for Education

 
America’s parents are quite happy with the quality of the education their children are getting, and think their children are all above average. But there’s an enthusiasm gap depending on the race, income, marital status and level of education of parents.
 
 

75% of parents rate the quality of their child's education positively.



Parents are pleased with their children’s schools, despite frequent news coverage on failing schools and political debate on the need for school reform. A full three-quarters of parents rate the overall quality of their children’s education as excellent or good, but higher earners and white families are more likely to say “excellent,” while lower earners and minority families are more likely to say “good.” 

Nearly 9 in 10 parents rate their child's total academic experience - whether they like their teachers and peers, and going to school - positively.  

QUALITY OF SCHOOLS
BY INCOME
BY RACE
How parents rate their child's education


  • 3441176OverallExcellentGoodFairPoor01020304050
    Good
     Overall: 41

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88% of parents rate their children’s overall academic performance positively.



Parents also think their children are earning high marks. Despite the fact that the US ranks 27th in math and 17th in reading, two thirds of parents say their children’s overall academic performance is excellent or very good. They have similar positive views on their child’s grades, but the level of enthusiasm is different depending on the race, education and marital status of parents. Married, highly educated or white parents are more likely to rate their child’s grades as excellent.

HOW PARENTS RATE THEIR CHILD'S GRADES
BY RACE
BY EDUCATION LEVEL
BY MARITAL STATUS
How parents rate their child's grades


  • 37272393OverallExcellentVery GoodGoodFairPoor01020304050

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Bare majority (50%) of parents favor the Common Core State Standards



When it comes to standards in education, overall, parents are equally satisfied with the current academic standards in their schools. Traditionally, across the country each state set their own set of academic standards. Since 2010, many states across the country have adopted a common set of standards, called the Common Core. While the bare majority of parents surveyed support the Common Core, there is a substantial group who are opposed with support more likely to be found among Democrats and Independents, and opposition found largely among Republicans.

Parents above the age of 40 are more likely to favor raising the academic standards at their child’s school than younger parents.

56% of parents believe that the academic standards in their child’s school should stay the same

37% of parents believe that current academic standards need to be raised.         

2% of parents believe that the current academic standards at their child’s school should be lowered.

Parents above the age of 40 are more likely to favor raising the academic standards at their child’s school than younger parents.

56% of parents believe that the academic standards in their child’s school should stay the same

COMMON CORE
BY PARTY AFFILIATION
BY EDUCATION LEVEL
BY RACE
How do parents view the Common Core?


  • 38.0%12.0%50.0%
    OpposeDon't KnowFavor

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What is Common Core?

 

 

The Road Ahead

 
Parents today see a tougher road ahead for their children than they faced, but they are still optimistic for their child’s future. When looking at the future, there is a gap in optimism among races and party affiliations.

 

 

63% of parents believe their children will face more problems growing up than they did.



Today’s parents are more optimistic than parents were 17 years ago. In 1998, when parents were asked if they believed their children will face more problems growing up than they did, 78% said their children will have more problems. That was before 9/11, before the dot-com bubble burst, and before the Great Recession. Now, 63% of parents believe their children will face more problems growing up than they did.

68% of parents who believe that their child's school is not preparing them to enter the job market also believe that their child will face more problems growing up.

75% of parents who rate their child's education as "Fair" or "Poor" think that their child is going to encounter more problems growing up.

57% of parents who rate their child's education as "Excellent" or "Very Good" think that their child is going to face more problems growing up.

68% of parents who believe that their child's school is not preparing them to enter the job market also believe that their child will face more problems growing up.

75% of parents who rate their child's education as "Fair" or "Poor" think that their child is going to encounter more problems growing up.

TOUGHER ROAD
BY GENDER
BY RACE
Do children face more problems than their parents did when they were young?


  • 63727OverallMore ProblemsFewer ProblemsSame Amount010203040506070

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Parents are divided about their child's future.



When asked the historic question of whether today’s children will be better or worse off than they are, parents are divided. The gaps in optimism vary by a parent’s age, income, race and party affiliation. Parents who are lower income and younger have a brighter view of their child’s future, while older, white and Republican parents seem to be less optimistic. 

THE FUTURE
BY RACE
BY AGE
BY INCOME
BY PARTY AFFILIATION
Will children be better off or worse off than their parents?


  • 5.0%7.0%48.0%40.0%
    SameDon't KnowBetter OffWorse Off

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51% of parents believe that schools are not preparing kids to enter the job market if they do not choose to go on to college.

 

Bright Futures

 
To be successful in the future, parents believe their children need to have a career they enjoy. To get there, parents believe children need to achieve post-secondary education, have good social and communication skills, and respect others.”

 

 

86% of parents say children need more than a high school degree to achieve the American Dream.



By and large, parents want the same thing for their children-- success. But what success looks like is different for many parents. While 46% of parents say their children will be successful in the future if they have a career they enjoy, 23% say the metric for success is financial security and 12% say having a family of their own is success. No matter their race, the vast majority of parents believe their children need more than a high school diploma in order to achieve the American Dream.

ACHIEVING THE AMERICAN DREAM
What level of education do children need to achieve the American Dream?
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54% of parents believe good social and communication skills are more important than grades for future success.



Emotional intelligence, or the ability to read others and respond accordingly, is at the core of social and communication skills. Research has shown that those with high emotional intelligence have better attention skills and fewer learning problems, and are generally more successful in academic and workplace settings. When it comes to skills children need to achieve success, parents don’t rank grades as number 1. In fact, 54% of parents said good social and communication skills are more important to a child’s future success than grades. However, the emphasis on grades is different based on a parent’s race and level of education.

55% of Hispanic parents think responsibility is one of the most important quality for children to have as they grow up.

    Thinking about the most important quality that children should have, 50% of parents say respecting others is at the top.

      Mothers are more likely to think that the most important quality for kids to have is respect for others. While fathers are more likely to think that determination and strong work ethic is more important.

      54% of white parents prioritize determination and strong as one of the most important qualities for children to have. Only 38% of minorities agree.

      55% of Hispanic parents think responsibility is one of the most important quality for children to have as they grow up.

        Thinking about the most important quality that children should have, 50% of parents say respecting others is at the top.

          SKILLS FOR SUCCESS
          BY RACE
          BY EDUCATION LEVEL
          What skills are most important for future success?
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          Social & Emotional Development

          These growth charts can help you support your child’s social and emotional development, and reflect on your own skills in the process.

          VISIT PARENT TOOLKIT

           

          Download & Share

          Use the links below to download the full report or a one-page summary of the findings. You can also help spread the word by sharing this on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, or via email.

          DOWNLOAD FULL REPORT     DOWNLOAD SUMMARY




          NBC News Chief Education Correspondent Rehema Ellis and Parenting Expert Michele Borba discussed the findings of the poll in a series of webinars.

          WATCH THEM NOW


          Produced By:
          NBC Education Nation
          Supported By:
          Pearson

           

          Fathers Are Important Too

          Posted: Tue, 03/01/2016 - 06:50


          Depression in Mom or Dad Increases Risk of Premature Baby


          Photo

          Having a mother or father who is depressed increases the risk of preterm birth, a new study has found.

          Swedish researchers used data on 366,499 singleton births, and assessed whether parents had been given a diagnosis of depression or filled a prescription for antidepressant drugs between a year before conception and the end of the second trimester.

          Among mothers, a “new” diagnosis of depression, defined as getting a depression diagnosis after a year without one, was associated with a 34 percent increased risk of moderately preterm birth (32 to 36 weeks’ gestation). Recurrent maternal depression was associated with a 42 percent increased risk.

          Recurrent paternal depression was not associated with preterm birth. But new paternal depression increased the risk for moderately preterm birth slightly and the risk for very preterm birth (22 to 31 weeks’ gestation) by 38 percent. Thestudy, in BJOG, controlled for maternal depression, parents’ age, smoking and other factors.

          “The message — and it might be self-evident — is that fathers are also important,” said the senior author, Dr. Anders Hjern, an epidemiologist at the Karolinska Institute. “Having a mentally healthy and supportive father who can provide a favorable environment for his partner is also good for the baby. And maternity care interventions should also include the father. Sometimes the father is forgotten.”

           

          Average Height and Weight of Children

          Posted: Thu, 01/14/2016 - 10:02

          An average 4-year-old weighs about 40 pounds and is about 40 inches tall. Kids gain about 4-5 pounds (2 kilograms) and grow about 2-3 inches (5 to 8 centimeters) per year.

          Why the iPad Isn't the Devil

          Posted: Fri, 10/30/2015 - 11:58


          Op-Ed 

          An Angry Birds guide to parenting


          Noah Berlatsky

          "Wow," my 11-year-old son said, pointing out the window of the car. "That's a Porsche!"

          I can barely tell a Porsche from a water buffalo. So I was somewhat bewildered to discover that my son was a car connoisseur. "How can you tell that's a Porsche from over here?" I asked, somewhat testily.

          "Oh," he said. "I watch 'Top Gear' all the time."

          The television. It had educated him.


          TV and the iPhone and the iPad and all the myriad screens that flicker and glow and burrow into our unresisting frontal lobes — these things aren't supposed to edify children. Or at least, there have always been somber voices insisting that those flat, moving images will dumb kids down rather than smarten them up.


          Newton Minow famously looked upon television back in the 1960s and proclaimed it a "vast wasteland" that could destroy the brains of the young and impressionable. More recently, in 2011, the American Academy of Pediatrics issued guidelines recommending no screen time at all for children under the age of 2.

          Of course, many parents, educators and experts are leery of too much screen time after that, as well. They worry that screens shorten attention spans, and that if we expose our kids to them, we'll breed a generation of monsters.

          My son is now about as sweet a Porsche-identifying tween as you could possibly wish for, but back before he could walk he was a colicky, stubborn, cranky nightmare. If my wife and I could shut him up, via any means, we did so, whether that meant stuffing Cheerios into him or sticking him in front of a "Thomas the Tank Engine" video, AAP guidelines or no AAP guidelines. AAP members were not showing up at our door to babysit; therefore, they lost their vote.

          I did feel some guilt about all that Thomas, but now the AAP has absolved me. It has issued new guidelines that very reasonably point out that "media is just another environment." The guidelines suggest paying attention to what your kids watch without panicking about it. Don't let them watch so much YouTube that they never interact with you, and think twice about showing your toddler that "Friday the 13th" marathon. But an hour of Angry Birds on the phone isn't going to hurt anyone.

          On the contrary, screens can be an amazing resource for kids of whatever age, just as they are for adults. Although the AAP says that most games for toddlers don't have much educational value, that doesn't mean they're worthless — unless you think there's no worth in a happy baby giggling at flashing lights. An entertained, happy child is a good thing, even if he's not being turned into an Einstein-level genius. Speaking from personal experience: better playing Angry Birds than eating dust mites. (Granted, those activities aren't always mutually exclusive.)


          And once kids get a little older, screens really can become a valuable educational tool. My wife has been gleefully watching John Oliver with our son; the boy is now up to date on all sorts of issues, from immigration to standardized testing. He's also startlingly tuned into pop culture; he always knows what films are coming out well before I do. That may seem like a useless, frivolous skill, but as a pop culture critic, knowing what movies are coming out is supposed to be my job. Not that I want him to follow in my keystrokes, but if he does, all this Web surfing will count as career training.

          New media technologies are always greeted with suspicion. Once upon a time, cultural arbiters were worried that novels would corrupt young women. "Although our productions have afforded more extensive and unaffected pleasure than those of any other literary corporation in the world," Jane Austen declared, "no species of composition has been so much decried." Eventually, novels were accepted as an ennobling pastime, and now the complaint is that kids aren't reading enough of them and are instead reading Twitter.

          Information delivery systems are just information delivery systems; there's nothing sacred about one, or anything satanic about another. People worry that screens will prevent kids from learning. But I'm sure I'm not the only parent whose kid has looked up from his screen, glanced out the window and told me something about the world that I didn't know.

          Noah Berlatsky edits the comics and culture website the Hooded Utilitarian and is the author of the book "Wonder Woman: Bondage and Feminism in the Marston/Peter Comics, 1941-1948."

           

           

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